Bally-Scholl reaction

What is Bally-Scholl reaction?

The Bally-Scholl reaction, also known as the Bally reaction, Bally benzanthrone synthesis, or Bally-Scholl benzanthrone synthesis, was initially reported by Bally in 1905 and later studied by Bally and Scholl in 1911. This reaction involves the condensation of anthraquinone with acrolein in the presence of an acidic condensing agent, particularly sulfuric acid (H2SO4), to produce benzanthrone.

Scholl further investigated the formation of acrolein from glycerol and sulfuric acid in 1936, contributing to the understanding of this reaction. The typical yield of the Bally-Scholl reaction ranges from 50-60%.

Bally-Scholl reaction
Bally-Scholl reaction

In industrial applications, benzanthrone is produced by reacting anthraquinone, glycerol, and iron in concentrated H2SO4, where acrolein can be generated in situ. This reaction reduces 9,10-anthraquinone to anthracene-9(10H)-one. Despite its use in producing various types of dye molecules, the Bally-Scholl reaction remains a valuable tool for synthesizing benzanthrone.

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