Norrish type I and type II reactions

What are Norrish type I and type II reactions?

Norrish type I and type II reactions are organic chemical reactions in which an alkene is converted into a carbonyl compound through the action of an ultraviolet light source. The reactions were discovered by the British chemist George Norrish in the 1950s and are named after him..

The Norrish type I reaction involves the cleavage of the alkene to produce two carbonyl compounds, while the Norrish type II reaction involves the cleavage of the alkene to produce a single carbonyl compound. Both reactions involve the formation of a transient species called a “triplet excited state,” which is formed when the alkene absorbs energy from the ultraviolet light..

One of the key features of the Norrish type I and type II reactions is that they allow for the synthesis of carbonyl compounds from alkenes, which can be useful for synthesizing a wide range of compounds for various applications. Carbonyl compounds are also important intermediates in a number of chemical reactions and can serve as starting materials for the synthesis of other compounds..

Norrish type I and type II reactions can be performed under a variety of conditions, including both acidic and basic conditions. The choice of conditions depends on the specific reactants and desired product, and can be influenced by factors such as the stability of the intermediate and the ability to control the regiochemistry of the reaction..

Summary

Norrish type I and type II reactions are useful tools for synthesizing carbonyl compounds and have a wide range of applications in the field of organic chemistry..

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